Burnage Memory Bank


What is Burnage Memory Bank?

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Click here to view the project’s website

Burnage Memory Bank is a two year project celebrating the stories and experiences of Burnage people. Funded by the People’s Health Trust, the project is based at Burnage Library but will be popping up all over Burnage.

We’d love to hear from you if you:

  • Have memories, photographs, or stories of Burnage you’d like to share.
  • Would like to be a memory bank champion and develop the skills to gather and record local people’s stories.
  • Want to be a part of deciding how the project is run and how we can reach everyone in Burnage who has a story to tell.

 

Get in touch with Amanda Wait at Burnage Library on 0161 227 3774, pop into the library for a chat or email me on memorybank@burnageactivityhub.org.uk

 

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Recent Posts about the Memory Bank:

  • Local History Group – Wartime Items April 27, 2017 Over the last few months, many of our group members have brought in items belonging to close family members from both the world wars. It made sense to devote a session to these items, bringing them to wider audience. More importantly perhaps, it encouraged individuals to present to the group as a whole, talking for a short time on a subject (such their father’s, grandfather’s or brother’s wartime service, or perhaps their mother’s work in wartime industries).   We were treated to a superb array of items. Joyce lead the way, bringing a huge number of wartime medals, newspapers (from both the front line and a VE Day copy of the Manchester Evening News) and personal letters from those serving overseas in Eritrea. Dorothy provided us ...
  • St. Margaret’s National School Archives March 28, 2017 This afternoon we were joined by John Pollard, archivist at St. Margaret’s church on Burnage Lane, for a session focusing on the St. Margaret’s national school. John began with a presentation covering the history of the school until its closure in the mid 1930s, starting by giving us some background context to Burnage and its growth in the mid-nineteenth century from the census returns. Occupations changed significantly in this period, with a decline in traditional agricultural labour and weaving matched by significant growth in positions which serviced the needs of the new merchant houses: gardeners, coachmen and so on. We were given the background to the school’s formation, learning that the township of Burnage for a time belonged to the parish of St. Paul’s in Withington, ...
  • Railways and People – Eddie Johnson at Burnage Library March 7, 2017 We were taken back to the age of steam this afternoon, with Eddie Johnson talking us through a huge number his historic photographs of the railways. The focus was less on the great locomotives that powered their way across the country than the people who worked on, or whose lives were shaped by the railways. There were images of drivers, firemen, linesmen, navvies, station masters, porters, and passengers, with a fair few spotters too! Attention was drawn to the costumes of the people, with the marked divisions of class and wealth visible among the public, with seniority, rank and position clearly demonstrable among the railway companies’ workers. While focus was given to the immediate area around Manchester, showing 19th and 20th Century ...
  • Eddie Johnson – Railways and People, 2:00- 07th March March 6, 2017
  • A Woman’s Work… February 28, 2017 In celebration of International Women’s Week in 6th – 12th March, the Burnage Memory Bank will be gathering women’s memories of their working lives. Stories will be displayed in the Library over March. Use the questions to start you off and write as much or as little as you like! If you have any photos – we’d love to see them! Talk to Amanda Wait or John McCrory or email memorybank@burnageactivityhub.org.uk for more information. If you have any recollections you’d like to add, or know somebody whose story has yet to be told, why not visit our Memory Bank website and make a contribution, download a form and email us at memorybank@burnageactivityhub.org.uk, or fill in a form and bring it to us ...
  • A Working Life at Withington Hospital February 28, 2017 From the workhouse of the Chorlton Union to the largest teaching hospital in Europe, this afternoon we charting the fascinating development of Withington Hospital on Nell Lane. Beginning with a presentation on the workhouse, we looked at the utilitarian principles leading to their creation, the pioneering ‘pavillions’ designed by Thomas Worthington to Florence Nightingale’s specifications, a look at the daily life of its ‘inmates’, and Admiral Doenitz’s impressions of a submarine while a prisoner of war. After a welcome tea break we were given a fascinating account of nursing life at Withington by Antoinette Hunter, illustrated with an array of her personal photographs, newspaper cuttings and excerpts from books and articles. In describing the development of microscopic surgery, the use of leeches in reconstructive surgery, ...
  • Local History Group – Exploring Photographs February 14, 2017 We had a fascinating session this afternoon thanks to people bringing in and sharing their photographs; among the many was Barbara showing us images taken by her husband of a chip-shop fire in Levenshulme, which featured in newspaper articles, and Sue with her photos showing the Whit parades along Stockport Road. It was a particular delight to welcome Eddie Johnson, author of many books on the railways, talking us through a tiny selection of his images showing local railway stations, older steam locomotives running on now disused lines, and some of the engineering works in the construction of the Kingsway estate in Burnage. He will give a free talk to the group at 2:00 on 7th March about the transformative influence the railways ...
  • Chris Makepeace at Burnage Library February 7, 2017 A full house greeted our guest speaker Chris Makepeace this afternoon, and they were rewarded with a wonderful talk about the value of photographs in understanding our history. Illustrated with a reel full of seldom seen images, we were given advice on examining and dating photographs. What buildings were in the background- were some of these recently erected or subsequently demolished? What about the public transport- were the trams driven by horses or electric? Examine hair styles and fashions for further clues! He continued describing the variety of ways in which photographs have given us a fuller appreciation of the past, including insights into working lives and early depictions of the Mancunian slums. Impressing on us the value of our own photographs, he ...
  • Local History Guest Speaker – Chris Makepeace on ‘The Camera as Historian’ February 5, 2017 Join us on Tuesday afternoon at 2:00 as we welcome Chris Makepeace, renowned local historian and author of a number of books on Manchester, who will explore the use of photography as a historical resource. The talk is free and everybody is welcome!
  • Exploring 19th Century Burnage January 17, 2017 Resuming our sessions after the Christmas break, we spent the afternoon immersed in the 1861 census for the Burnage area. After a brief introduction on the origins of the census, looking at how it was gathered and the type of information it collected, we dived into the census records themselves. Many items of interest were noted- the very first records we encounter in 1861 relate to what we’d now class as Ladybarn, the railway line later severed this area from the rest of Burnage! It was fascinating to note how rural the population of the area was; a significant number of farms thrived in the parish, housing a number of farm labourers  from across the country. Domestic staff too were drawn from across the United Kingdom, with ...